drush make

Managing upstream integrations and releases

The AWS SDK for PHP Drupal integration project, that I maintain, provides releases that correspond to each release made by Amazon. Having releases that correspond to an upstream source is something that you see in Linux packaging systems and offers some interesting bonuses. In Linux distribution model individuals do not monitor upstream for changes, and packages are rebuilt and increment version regardless of changes to the packaging scripts themselves. Given that Drupal distributions mimic Linux distributions in many ways and even individual site builds I think the reasons behind making corresponding releases are interesting and worth consideration.

To clarify what releases corresponding to upstream releases means consider the following from the AWS SDK for PHP project page.

Since Drupal.org does not allow for three-part version numbers this project follows the AWS SDK for PHP 1.x development line and the release version mapping is as follows. The mapping shows the Drupal release to the Amazon release. Please ensure you are using a Drupal module and Amazon SDK pair that match the version number mapping. For example, use the 4.1 Drupal module with the 1.4.1 Amazon SDK.

  • 4.x -> 1.4.x
  • 3.x -> 1.3.x
  • 2.x -> 1.2.x

Making a release whenever upstream makes a release means that some releases may end up with little or no changes to the actual Drupal module. The AWS SDK module provides a Drush Make file that is updated each release to point to the matching upstream release, but that is the only change for some of the releases.

Making arbitrary releases may sound foolish at first, but consider some of the advantages.

  • Drupal site maintainers and distributions developers can receive update notifications from the standard Drupal core update system instead of having to monitor upstream for releases. Making it easier to watch for updates encourages keeping up-to-date with upstream changes which has implied benefits.
  • Any incompatibilities with a specific version of a third-party system or upstream library do not need to be kept track of since the integration project is always used with a specific upstream release.
  • New features or configuration options from an upstream source may be added immediately to the integration module without worry about incompatibility with older releases of the upstream source. Meaning if a configuration variable changes name or a new option is added it can be exposed through a Drupal UI without worry if people are using the appropriate upstream version (since they are always intended to work with a matching release).
  • When building a site or distribution using Drush Make specific versions of upstream libraries can be easily included using the corresponding Drupal project with a proper make file. If one wants AWS SDK 2.6 simply add projects[awssdk] = 2.6 instead of having to include the Drupal project and override any third party generic make script.
  • Handling of updates, when necessary, is much simplier since you always know the library version that was used with the previous release.

The general pattern that seems to emmerge is that upstream sources integrate better into Drupal workflow, tools, and infrastructure when matching releases are made.

It does not seem that any other (or few if they exist) third-party integrations or library integrations on drupal.org follow this workflow. Making corresponding releases may not be appropriate in all situations, but I think it warrants consideration and I am interested to hear thoughts on the subject.

Drush, Drush Make, other Drupal packages, and development setup for openSUSE

I have recently added drush and drush make packages to my openSUSE repository. For more information or to report bugs on the packages please visit their respective project pages: drush and drush_make.

To install the packages you can use the one-click installers provided by the build service or manually add my repository and install the packages as shown bellow.

su
zypper ar http://download.opensuse.org/repositories/home:/boombatower/openSUSE_11.[2 or 3]/ home:boombatower
zypper in drush drush_make

Also note my existing Drupal packages: drupal-dev and drupal-vhosts, as well as the LAMP Drupal one-click pattern. The latter package (drupal-vhosts) is very useful in setting up a multi-drupal version, multi-subdomain work environment.

To use simply install and run the command to point the virtual hosts to the directory containing your Drupal code.

su
zypper in drupal-vhosts
drupal-vhost /path/to/main/software/directory

Either edit the hosts file directory or use YaST -> Network Services -> Hostnames to add an entry for every Drupal version you wish to run (package currently supports 6, 7, and 8). The relevant lines from my /etc/hosts file are as follows.

127.0.0.1       d7x.loc 
127.0.0.1       d6x.loc 

For my setup I use /home/boombatower/software for all my code with Drupal cores in drupal-7 and drupal-6 directories respectively. If you want to have subdomains for your sites just add more entries to /etc/hosts and use the respective Drupal sites directories.

Personally, I then create symbolic links to all my modules so that the code resides in the root of the software directory, but can be used by any respective site. This makes the paths to modules and what not much shorter and easier to reference from multiple specific sub-sites and what not. For example to link pathauto to the all modules directory for Drupal 7 I would execute the following.

ln -s ~/software/pathauto ~/software/drupal-7/sites/all/modules

Or from within the sites/all/modules directory as I tend to do.

ln -s ~/software/pathauto .

Also note, to enable mod_rewrite and get clean URLs to work simply go to YaST -> System -> /etc/sysconfig Editor then Network -> WWW -> Apache 2 -> APACHE_MODULES and add rewrite to the end of the line. You can do so manually of course as well.

In order for the virtual host changes and apache module addition to take effect you will need to restart apache and for the /etc/hosts changes you need to restart the network which you can do with the following commands run as root.

rcapache2 restart
rcnetwork restart

The end result of all this work is beautiful URLs like: http://d7x.loc/node/1, http://foo.d7x.loc/user, and http://d6x.loc/.

I also create a similar structure within MySQL. First, I set an easy to remember MySQL root password since there really no reason for it not to be easy to remember and it is helpful when having to enter it a lot.

mysqladmin -u root password EASY_TO_REMEMBER_PASSWORD

Next setup a drupal user in MySQL and give the user all permissions to d7x* and d6x* named databases which allows us to use a single user for all our drupal sites (much easier to remember login info) without having to update privileges all the time. I name my databases the same as virtual hosts, so for d7x.loc I would have d7x as the database name and for foo.d7x.loc I would have d7x-foo.

CREATE USER 'drupal'@'localhost' IDENTIFIED BY  'EASY_TO_REMEMBER_PASSWORD';
GRANT USAGE ON * . * TO  'drupal'@'localhost' IDENTIFIED BY  'SAME_EASY_TO_REMEMBER_PASSWORD' ;
 
GRANT ALL PRIVILEGES ON  `d7x%` . * TO  'drupal'@'localhost';
GRANT ALL PRIVILEGES ON  `d6x%` . * TO  'drupal'@'localhost';

Anytime you want to add a database for a new site simply run the following.

CREATE DATABASE  `DATABASE_NAME` ;

Enjoy your fancy development environment!

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